Caporale Family Tree (and everyone else related)

Johanna Fredericka TraubAge: 85 years18171903

Name
Johanna Fredericka Traub
Given names
Johanna Fredericka
Surname
Traub
Married name
Schmucker
Publication: Self

Johanna Friderika Traub

Name
Johanna Friderika Traub
Given names
Johanna Friderika
Surname
Traub
Married name
Schmucker
Publication: Self
Birth August 6, 1817 32 33
Publication: Self
Birth of a sisterJohanna Christiana Traub
October 2, 1818 (Age 13 months)
Marriage of a parentFriederich Gottlieb TraubChristina Rosina KutrufView this family
October 10, 1819 (Age 2 years)
Birth of a half-sisterRosina Karolina Traub
May 3, 1820 (Age 2 years)
Birth of a half-brotherJohann Gottlieb Traub
January 6, 1822 (Age 4 years)
Birth of a half-brotherGottfried Friedrich Traub
January 14, 1827 (Age 9 years)
Immigration 1830 (Age 12 years)
Publication: Self
Text:

Recorded in family records: zog 1829 mit siener Familie nach Bessarabien (Gnadenthal!). The name means "Valley of Grace"

Birth of a half-brotherChristian Friedrich Traub
May 10, 1831 (Age 13 years)
Birth of a half-sisterChristina Katharina Traub
December 4, 1837 (Age 20 years)
Religious marriageJoseph SchmuckerView this family
August 25, 1838 (Age 21 years)

Birth of a daughter
#1
Rosina Christine Schmucker
December 4, 1840 (Age 23 years)
Publication: Self
Birth of a son
#2
Joseph Schmucker
November 15, 1842 (Age 25 years)
Publication: Self
Birth of a daughter
#3
Katherina Schmucker
October 25, 1844 (Age 27 years)
Publication: Self
Birth of a daughter
#4
Elizabeth Schmucker
January 8, 1847 (Age 29 years)

Publication: Self
Birth of a daughter
#5
Maria Magdelana Schmucker
December 30, 1848 (Age 31 years)
Publication: Self
Birth of a son
#6
Gottlieb Friederich Schmucker
November 25, 1850 (Age 33 years)
Birth of a son
#7
Johann Georg Schmucker
June 24, 1853 (Age 35 years)
Birth of a son
#8
Johannus Schmucker
September 14, 1855 (Age 38 years)
Birth of a daughter
#9
Johanna Friedericka Schmucker
January 2, 1858 (Age 40 years)
Publication: Self
Note: She could also have been born on 14 Jan.
Birth of a daughter
#10
Louise Christine Schmucker
January 15, 1860 (Age 42 years)
Publication: Self
Immigration September 25, 1873 (Age 56 years)
Publication: Self
Text:

Arrived on the S.S. Cimbria.

Birth of a son
#11
Johannes Friederich Schmucker
December 23, 1889 (Age 72 years)
Birth of a son
#12
Friederich Wilhelm Schmucker
December 23, 1889 (Age 72 years)
Death March 5, 1903 (Age 85 years)
Publication: Self
Text:

Forest Bay Cemetery

Note:

Obituary: Johanna Schmucker nee Traub

Harbor Beach, Michigan, United States of America March 12, 1903

Again one of our tired pilgrims, after a long life, has closed her eyes. It is this widow, Johanna Schmucker, nee Traub. She saw the light of this world on August 6, 1817, at Brettach in the kingdom of Wurttenurg, Germany. When she was 12 years old, she migrated with her parents to Southern Russia. Later, in the year 1838, she entered the state of holy matrimony with Joseph Schmucker, who preceded her into eternity through a blessed death already in 1886. This marriage produced 12 children, of whom 7 are still living, besides 44 grandchildren and 15 great grand children. She remained a widow since her husband's death.

She emigrated to this country with her husband in 1873. Their next residence was made in the state of Illinois, but already in 1879, they moved here.

She and her deceased husband belong to the charted members of our congregation and were lifelong faithful members. The deceased, as long as she could, faithfully attended our services and was a frequent guest at the Lord's table. Although she loved 4 miles from church on a farm, she seldom missed attending services (God's House) on Sunday and festival days.

In her domestic life she was a real Martha in a good sense of the word. She served humbly and offered her self sacrificing energetic service in the fulfillment of her duties which are the chief aim (objectives) of her life. She was a faithful helper of her husband and a concerned mother to her children. Four years ago the Lord began to break down her Earthly frame (hut of life); she became a victim of stroke. She recovered somewhat, but her members and sense began one after another to deny her services so that at last she became more helpless, until the Lord on March 5th, through a second stroke led her out of her miserable physical condition after a four week semi-coma and delivered her into everlasting life through a peaceful death at the age of 85 years, 6 months and 29 days.

In her 4 last years, when she could not do as she wanted because of her bodily infirmity and because of her energetic temperment, she became the most difficult - offering suffering from impatience. "If I can't do anything worthwhile why doesn't the Lord unhitch me?" she could very well cry out. But she clung to God's word and often drew comfort from it. It was simply the Lord's appointed time of lingering and suffering. And we hope He surely had accomplished his purpose, as she has by grace entered into Jerusalem above into everlasting life. May her remembrance be a blessing. On March 7, we gave her a Christian burial next to her husband. Her memorial sermon was based upon the wordes of the Prophet, Elijah: "It is enough; Now O Lord, take away my life!" 1 Kings 19:4

Translated from German by Margaret Feiss Hafner

(Johanna Traub Schmucker is buried beside her husband Joseph in the little cemetery on the Schmucker farm at Harbor Beach, MI.)

Family with parents - View this family
father
mother
Marriage:
herself
-19 months
elder sister
3 years
younger sister
Johanna Christiana Traub
Birth: October 2, 1818 34 34Brettach, Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany
Death: November 27, 1823Brettach, Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany
Father’s family with Christina Rosina Kutruf - View this family
father
step-mother
Marriage: October 10, 1819Brettach, Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany
7 months
half-sister
20 months
half-brother
5 years
half-brother
4 years
half-brother
7 years
half-sister
Family with Joseph Schmucker - View this family
husband
herself
Marriage: August 25, 1838
17 years
son
-7 years
daughter
9 years
daughter
2 years
daughter
-19 years
daughter
4 years
daughter
-23 months
son
4 years
daughter
43 years
son
Johannes Friederich Schmucker
Birth: December 23, 1889 72 72Sarata, Bessarabia, Russia
Death: December 31, 1839Sarata, Bessarabia, Russia
son
Friederich Wilhelm Schmucker
Birth: December 23, 1889 72 72Sarata, Bessarabia, Russia
Death: January 2, 1840Sarata, Bessarabia, Russia
-39 years
son
3 years
son
Johann Georg Schmucker
Birth: June 24, 1853 36 35Sarata, Bessarabia, Russia
Death: September 21, 1854Sarata, Bessarabia, Russia

BirthSchmucker-Traub Family
Publication: Self
ImmigrationSchmucker-Traub Family
Publication: Self
Text:

Recorded in family records: zog 1829 mit siener Familie nach Bessarabien (Gnadenthal!). The name means "Valley of Grace"

MarriageSarata Confirmation Records
ImmigrationSchmucker-Traub Family
Publication: Self
Text:

Arrived on the S.S. Cimbria.

NameSchmucker-Traub Family
Publication: Self
NameSchmucker-Traub Family
Publication: Self
DeathSchmucker-Traub Family
Publication: Self
Text:

Forest Bay Cemetery

NoteGenealogy.com
Death

Obituary: Johanna Schmucker nee Traub

Harbor Beach, Michigan, United States of America March 12, 1903

Again one of our tired pilgrims, after a long life, has closed her eyes. It is this widow, Johanna Schmucker, nee Traub. She saw the light of this world on August 6, 1817, at Brettach in the kingdom of Wurttenurg, Germany. When she was 12 years old, she migrated with her parents to Southern Russia. Later, in the year 1838, she entered the state of holy matrimony with Joseph Schmucker, who preceded her into eternity through a blessed death already in 1886. This marriage produced 12 children, of whom 7 are still living, besides 44 grandchildren and 15 great grand children. She remained a widow since her husband's death.

She emigrated to this country with her husband in 1873. Their next residence was made in the state of Illinois, but already in 1879, they moved here.

She and her deceased husband belong to the charted members of our congregation and were lifelong faithful members. The deceased, as long as she could, faithfully attended our services and was a frequent guest at the Lord's table. Although she loved 4 miles from church on a farm, she seldom missed attending services (God's House) on Sunday and festival days.

In her domestic life she was a real Martha in a good sense of the word. She served humbly and offered her self sacrificing energetic service in the fulfillment of her duties which are the chief aim (objectives) of her life. She was a faithful helper of her husband and a concerned mother to her children. Four years ago the Lord began to break down her Earthly frame (hut of life); she became a victim of stroke. She recovered somewhat, but her members and sense began one after another to deny her services so that at last she became more helpless, until the Lord on March 5th, through a second stroke led her out of her miserable physical condition after a four week semi-coma and delivered her into everlasting life through a peaceful death at the age of 85 years, 6 months and 29 days.

In her 4 last years, when she could not do as she wanted because of her bodily infirmity and because of her energetic temperment, she became the most difficult - offering suffering from impatience. "If I can't do anything worthwhile why doesn't the Lord unhitch me?" she could very well cry out. But she clung to God's word and often drew comfort from it. It was simply the Lord's appointed time of lingering and suffering. And we hope He surely had accomplished his purpose, as she has by grace entered into Jerusalem above into everlasting life. May her remembrance be a blessing. On March 7, we gave her a Christian burial next to her husband. Her memorial sermon was based upon the wordes of the Prophet, Elijah: "It is enough; Now O Lord, take away my life!" 1 Kings 19:4

Translated from German by Margaret Feiss Hafner

(Johanna Traub Schmucker is buried beside her husband Joseph in the little cemetery on the Schmucker farm at Harbor Beach, MI.)

Note

German Emigrants One group migration that some researchers may have come across is Germans from Russia who went to the U.S. One hundred years before their migration to the U.S., Catherine the Great of Russia, a former German princess, wanted Europeans, especially Germans, to settle in Russia. Russia had a large amount of unsettled land along the Volga and Catherine wanted people to populate it, both to produce food and goods, and to serve as a buffer against invasion from Asia. In 1763 she issued a manifesto promising freedom of religion, freedom from taxes for a time, freedom from military service and land for farmers if they immigrated. Germany had been devastated by the Seven Years War (1756-63) and many were eager to improve their condition in a new land, especially if they were allowed to live in their own communities with German customs, language and religion. Thus, many thousands of Germans immigrated and set up German settlements in the Volga and Black Sea areas.

In 1871, their special status was revoked. At this same time, free land was available in the American Midwest and they again moved in large numbers, this time from Russia to the Midwest, with a large population settling in the Dakotas. Germans have been especially active in migrating as groups to other areas of Europe. The Russian rulers also aided Germans in settling in the area of the Black Sea, the Ukraine, Bessarabia and Siberia. In addition, Austrian rulers were eager to have German settlers in their open lands, including those that had been reclaimed from the Ottoman Empire so they provided assistance for those who wanted to immigrate. Many of the settlers came from Swabia, traveling down the Danube River and this is known as the Donauschwaben Migration. The Banat, which is now partially in Romania, Hungary and Slovenia, is one area where they settled. Up until World War I, many of these villages in Hungary were still largely German. After World War II, many of the Germans were expelled from these areas and returned to Germany.